What are the Masters doing in their gardens?

Posted 9/8/19

At a recent Master Gardener Volunteer meeting, gardeners broke into small groups to discuss what we are doing in our gardens. Master Gardener Volunteers are like minded and find communication very …

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What are the Masters doing in their gardens?

Posted

At a recent Master Gardener Volunteer meeting, gardeners broke into small groups to discuss what we are doing in our gardens. Master Gardener Volunteers are like minded and find communication very easy.

Our Master Gardeners consist of about 25 volunteers of various ages who find the conversations and comraderies a great joy as we share our gardening triumphs and tragedies.

Each group shared their information on a flip chart and it is being used to complete this article. The question was, what are you doing in your garden now? See their responses below:

Start collecting leaves to use as a mulch. Whole leaves are fine; however, chopping the leaves by mowing or mulching helps them to breakdown at a faster rate. Everyone concurred on using leaves as mulch – to save money, protect perennials and add organic matter to your beds.

Tying heavy tomatoes to supports, similar to the natural supports.

Thinning plants to share.

Journaling while transplanting to remind oneself on the changes that were made.

Cutting flowers for drying, especially hydrangeas, and having cut flowers to enjoy inside. Drying hydrangeas on rope upside down in the garage;

Drying herbs – remember to harvest in the morning and before the show of flowers. Dry as stated above with the hydrangeas, yarrow and cattails.

Save seeds and have an exchange with friends.

Create succession planting – when you harvest now, replace with cold hardy seeds or quick growing seeds. If there is a space in your garden, surely weeds will grow. Instead of weeds, grow other vegetables, like green leafy salads, i.e.: kale, collards, spinach or grow bush beans, carrots – quick crops and cool weather crops. Check the first frost date for an estimate of time you have in your area.

For more information, call our horticulture hotline Wednesday and Friday from 9 to noon at 315-736-3394.

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