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Tickets on sale for ‘Rent,’ ‘Bandstand’ at the Stanley

Posted 10/31/19

Tickets are on sale now for 2020 productions of “Rent” and “Bandstand” at the Stanley Theatre. • The 20th anniversary tour of the musical Rent will return to Utica Feb. 6. Tickets will be …

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Tickets on sale for ‘Rent,’ ‘Bandstand’ at the Stanley

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Tickets are on sale now for 2020 productions of “Rent” and “Bandstand” at the Stanley Theatre.

• The 20th anniversary tour of the musical Rent will return to Utica Feb. 6. Tickets will be available at the Broadway Utica’s box office 258 Genesee St., online at www.BroadwayUtica.org, or by calling 315-624-9444. Group orders of 10 or more may be placed by contacting Jill at 315-624-9444. 

In 1996, an original rock musical by a little-known composer opened on Broadway… and forever changed the landscape of American theatre. Two decades later, Jonathan Larson’s Rent continues to speak loudly and defiantly to audiences across generations and all over the world. And now, this Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning show returns to the stage in a vibrant 20th anniversary touring production. 

A re-imagining of Puccini’s La Bohème, Rentfollows an unforgettable year in the lives of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams without selling out. With its inspiring message of joy and hope in the face of fear, the timeless celebration of friendship and creativity reminds us to measure our lives with the only thing that truly matters — love.  

• “Bandstand,” winner of the 2017 Tony Award for best choreography, will play March 10. Tickets are $45-$65 and are available online at Ticketmaster and Thestanley.org, and in the box office from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and at 315-724-4000.

“Bandstand” was originally directed and choreographed by three-time Tony winner and “Hamilton” choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler and features music by Richard Oberacker with book and lyrics by Robert Taylor and Oberacker.

Set in 1945, it’s the story of Private Donny Novitski, a singer and songwriter who enters a national competition to find the next great musical superstars, and sees a lifeline for him and fellow veterans.

The New York Times described it as “both a peppy celebration of can-do spirit and a more somber exploration of what American servicemen experienced when they marched home from World War II. It’s a great argument for why theater can sometimes tell a story more boldly and more viscerally.”

Time Out New York said, “the show defies you not to be moved.”

The March 10 show is at 7 p.m.

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