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'The Invisible Man’ is solid and straight forward

Sean I. Mills
Staff writer
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Posted 3/8/20

Packed with thrills, chills and a good use of the classic movie monster, it is not hard to see why “The invisible Man” is a success. The new horror film with the classic baddie takes the idea …

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'The Invisible Man’ is solid and straight forward

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Packed with thrills, chills and a good use of the classic movie monster, it is not hard to see why “The invisible Man” is a success.

The new horror film with the classic baddie takes the idea back to basics and delivers a solid, straight forward fright. The only real twist this time around is that “The Invisible Man” is told from the victim’s perspective. It could have been called “The Visible Woman”.

But the politics are not heavy-handed. The movie instead gets the discussion of domestic violence just right.

Cecilia manages to escape from a toxic, abusive relationship with her very rich boyfriend Adrian, and is then almost immediately told that Adrian has committed suicide and left her a lot of money in his will. From then on, Cecilia swears she is being haunted by a dangerous figure that nobody can see.

“The Invisible Man” absolutely understands the terror in atmosphere. When your movie menace is invisible, you’ve got to use other movie tricks to build the frights and tell your story. Director Leigh Whannell has this well in hand. Tense music, lingering camera shots and well-executed jump scares do more than enough to make “The Invisible Man” a worthy horror flick.

Actor Elisabeth Moss easily carries the movie as Cecilia, the main victim.

She’s equal parts terrified and determined to prove she’s not going crazy, with a dash of courage as she goes up against an enemy she can’t see. This is not a slasher flick, where the monster just goes around killing his victims. “The Invisible Man” is a delicate duel, and Moss is excellent as our hero.

The Invisible Man himself is not much of a character, at least not in the physical sense. The movie does a great job of convincing the audience that he’s always lurking in a corner…or is he?

All told, “The Invisible Man” accomplishes exactly what it sets out to accomplish. It’s a spooky, tension-filled horror flick that takes its terror to an extra level by adding the domestic violence angle. That no one believes Cecilia that she has a stalker with the power to turn invisible is a solid metaphor for what the victims of domestic violence face when trying to come forward with their abuse. The movie makes this theme work.

“The Invisible Man” is a solid, enjoyable thriller made with real confidence.

For further review, check out the Sentinel Cinema podcast on Apple and Facebook, and at www.RomeSentinel.com/SentinelCinema.

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