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State funds to flow to Rome, Lowville for water projects

Posted 12/13/22

The city of Rome and the village of Lowville are among eight communities to share in $55.4 million in financial assistance for water infrastructure improvement projects.

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State funds to flow to Rome, Lowville for water projects

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ROME — The city of Rome and the village of Lowville are among eight communities to share in $55.4 million in financial assistance for water infrastructure improvement projects, the latest action to upgrade New York’s water and sewer systems, reduce water pollution, and safeguard vital drinking water supplies, according to an announcement by Gov. Kathy Hochul on Thursday.

The New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation Board of Directors approved low-cost financing and previously announced grants, authorizing municipal access to the capital needed to get shovels in the ground for four critical drinking water and sewer projects, the announcement said.

The Board also approved low-cost long-term financing for six completed projects, providing debt relief through lower interest rates than if the municipalities had borrowed on their own.

Rome will receive a total of nearly $6.68 million in assistance through two funding streams — $3,560,913 long-term interest-free financing for solids handling improvements at the city’s water pollution control facility, and $3,116,109 long-term interest-free financing for disinfection improvements at the water pollution control facility.

Lowville will receive a total of nearly $7 million in assistance, also through several awards, for its drinking water program, including $1,333,334 short-term interest-free financing, $2,666,666 short-term market rate financing, and $3,000,000 WIIA grant to install two groundwater supply wells, associated transmission mains and treatment, and upgrades to the village’s existing water filtration plant.

“Every New Yorker deserves access to clean drinking water and properly functioning sewer systems,” Hochul said. “This $55 million investment will not only improve our water infrastructure but also create healthier communities across New York. We will continue to take steps toward improving our water quality and supporting a healthy and prosperous future for all New Yorkers.”

The Board’s approvals include financings through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, as well as grants already announced pursuant to the Water Infrastructure Improvement (WIIA) program. Funding for water infrastructure from the federal Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is administered by EFC through the State Revolving Fund programs.

Other communities to receive funding for various projects include: City of Albany; the village of Champlain in Clinton; the village of Corinth in Saratoga County; the Livingston County Water and Sewer Authorit; the city of Oneonta in Otsego County ($6,749,263 long-term interest-free financing for upgrades to the city’s wastewater treatment plant), and the village of Schaghticoke in Rensselaer County.

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