Return home

NY state will have another class for high school sports

Posted 7/29/22

The largest high schools participating in the most populated sports across New York state are getting a new class.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

NY state will have another class for high school sports

Posted

The largest high schools participating in the most populated sports across New York state are getting a new class.

On Wednesday, the New York State Public High School Athletic Association’s Central Committee approved a sixth classification in seven sports beginning in the 2023-24 school year.

The sports that will be affected are boys and girls basketball, boys and girls soccer, baseball, softball and girls volleyball. Those sports each have 501 or more teams participating across the state. The move is a change from five classes used currently by the NYSPHSAA, which ranges from Class AA with schools with the highest enrollment numbers to Class D with the lowest enrollment numbers.

With the change, the largest schools will be grouped into a Class AAA. The 75 largest schools would move to the largest class and the 100 smallest schools would be in the smallest division, Section III Executive Director John Rathbun previously said. The four other divisions in between would break down depending on the number of schools participating.

Classifications are determined by school enrollment numbers, which have not been determined yet. The NYSPHSAA will collect enrollment data from all its schools this September, with the class alignments likely being announced sometime in October.

The idea behind the NYSPHSAA’s change is an effort to give more athletes an opportunity at winning state titles.

Utica’s Thomas R. Proctor High School’s enrollment number for 2022-23 is listed at 1,977, according to the NYSPHSAA website. That’s the most among districts in Section III, which includes 106 schools in 11 counties in and around Central New York.

Rome Free Academy (1,221), Whitesboro (734) and New Hartford (660) are among districts in the Mohawk Valley with higher enrollment numbers that could be affected.

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here