Return home

EDITORIAL: Help prevent suicide

Posted 9/14/22

Suicide is a tragedy, regardless of the circumstances. In the vast majority of cases, it is a preventable tragedy. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. If you or someone you know is …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

EDITORIAL: Help prevent suicide

Posted

Suicide is a tragedy, regardless of the circumstances.

In the vast majority of cases, it is a preventable tragedy.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. If you or someone you know is struggling or in crisis, help is available. Call or text 988.

Throughout the month of September, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI.org) highlights the “Together for Mental Health,” campaign which encourages people to bring their voices together to advocate for better mental health care, including an effective crisis response system.

After years of advocacy and preparation, NAMI’s website says 988 is now available nationwide as the new number to contact for mental health, substance use and suicide crises — a simple, easy-to-remember way for people to get help.

This new number will allow people to quickly connect with support during a crisis, 24/7, no matter where they live.

Ultimately, NAMI wants any person experiencing suicidal thoughts or behaviors to have a number to call, a system to turn to, that would connect them to the treatment and support they need.

We know that no segment of our community is immune but young people and veterans are among our most vulnerable and at-risk. Still, suicide is not isolated to those groups. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline says there are numerous risk factors for suicide that include:

Mental disorders, particularly mood disorders; schizophrenia; anxiety disorders and certain personality disorders; Alcohol and other substance use disorders; hopelessness; impulsive and/or aggressive tendencies; a history of trauma or abuse and major physical illnesses.

Also, family history of suicide; job or financial loss; loss of relationship(s); easy access to lethal means; local clusters of suicide; lack of social support and sense of isolation; stigma associated with asking for help. lack of health care, especially mental health and substance abuse treatment; cultural and religious beliefs, such as the belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma; exposure to others who have died by suicide (in real life or via the media and Internet).

NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness.

We urge you to call for help if you, or someone you love or even know, appears to be at-risk. Life is precious and worth saving.

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here