Check out the latest books at Jervis Public Library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

On May 14, 1796, Edward Jenner tested what would result in the first vaccination to protect people from smallpox. Jenner used cowpox to infect an 8-year-old boy and then exposed him to smallpox.

Read more about smallpox in the book “Pox: An American History” by Michael Willrich.  Call Jervis at 315-336-4570 to make an appointment to browse the shelves or for curbside pick up.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“Sooley: A Novel” by John Grisham. From Doubleday.

In the summer of his seventeenth year, Sam­uel Sooleymon gets the chance of a lifetime: a trip to the United States with his South Sudanese teammates to play in a showcase basket­ball tournament. Samuel is an amazing athlete, with speed, quick­ness, and an astonishing vertical leap. The rest of his game, though, needs work, and the American coaches are less than impressed.

During the tournament, Samuel receives dev­astating news from home: A civil war is raging across South Sudan, and rebel troops have ran­sacked his village. His father is dead, his sister is missing, and his mother and two younger brothers are in a refugee camp.

Samuel desperately wants to go home, but it’s just not possible. Partly out of sympathy, the coach of North Carolina Central offers him a scholar­ship. Samuel moves to Durham, enrolls in classes, joins the team, and prepares to sit out his freshman season. But Samuel has something no other player has: a fierce determination to succeed so he can bring his family to America. 

“Whereabouts” by Jhumpa Lahiri.  From Knopf.

In the arc of one year, an unnamed narrator in an unnamed city, in the middle of her life’s journey, realizes that she’s lost her way. The city she calls home acts as a companion and interlocutor: traversing the streets around her house, and in parks, piazzas, museums, stores, and coffee bars, she feels less alone.

We follow her to the pool she frequents, and to the train station that leads to her mother, who is mired in her own solitude after her husband’s untimely death. Among those who appear on this woman’s path are colleagues with whom she feels ill at ease, casual acquaintances, and “him,” a shadow who both consoles and unsettles her. Until one day at the sea, both overwhelmed and replenished by the sun’s vital heat, her perspective will abruptly change.

Kid’s Corner

“A Pizza with Everything on It” by Kyle Scheele.  From Chronicle Books.

It’s a tale as old as time: a kid wants to make a pizza with his dad, but not just any pizza . . . he wants a pizza with everything on it. That’s right, everything. But as the toppings pile on, this father-son duo accidentally create a pizza so delicious, so extravagant, so over-the-top, that it destroys the universe—and the cosmos go as dark as burnt crust. Will anyone enjoy pizza ever again? 

“Pig the Pug” by Aaron Blabey.  From Scholastic Press.

Pig is a greedy and selfish Pug. He has all the bouncy balls, bones, and chew toys a dog could ever want yet he refuses to share with his poor friend, Trevor. Little does he know, however, that being greedy has its consequences. Join Pig as he learns to share - the hard way!

Young readers will love the irresistibly quirky and funny illustrations that are paired with a relatable lesson of learning to share with others. For dog and pet lovers everywhere.

“Best Nerds Forever” by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein.  From jimmy patterson.

Being “nerdy” in middle school isn’t a bad thing–I should know! Me and my friends are nerds. Some of us are geeky but funny, smart but never boring. One is a jock but not jerk. We don’t quite fit. But we’re funny. We’re fun. We’re total chaos. And we own it–until one of us is targeted by a maniac. It will take all of our nerdiest skills to Sherlock Holmes our way out of one dangerous mess.

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