Check out the latest books at Jervis Public Library

Posted

Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

May 1 is May Day, and it is also the anniversary of the first program run in the new programming language BASIC. Developed by two professors from Dartmouth College and first run in 1964, BASIC stands for Beginner’s All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. VAX/VMS BASIC was the programming language used in Clifford Stoll’s book The Cuckoo’s Egg, the 1989 classic that tells the true story of the search for the hackers who accessed the computers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Reserve the book for curbside pick up or make a browsing appointment to pick it up in person.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“The Tucci Table: Cooking With Family and Friends” by Stanley Tucci and Felicity Blunt. From Gallery Books.

Stanley Tucci’s association with wonderful foods began for fans with the movie Big Night and resonated in his role as Julia Child’s husband in Julie & Julia. But well before these films, he was enjoying innovative homemade Italian meals throughout his childhood, when family and food were nearly inseparable and cooking was always a familial venture.

Now, in this family-focused cookbook, Tucci captivates food lovers’ imaginations with recipes from his traditional Italian roots as well as those of his British wife, Felicity Blunt, tied together with a modern American ribbon. 

“The Last Night in London” by Karen White.  From Berkley.

London, 1939. Beautiful and ambitious Eva Harlow and her American best friend, Precious Dubose, are trying to make their way as fashion models. When Eva falls in love with Graham St. John, an aristocrat and Royal Air Force pilot, she can’t believe her luck — she’s getting everything she ever wanted.

Then the Blitz devastates her world, and Eva finds herself slipping into a web of intrigue, spies, and secrets. 

London, 2019. American journalist Maddie Warner, whose life has been marked by the tragic loss of her mother, travels to London to interview Precious about her life in pre-WWII London. Maddie has been careful to close herself off to others, but in Precious she recognizes someone whose grief rivals her own—but unlike Maddie, Precious hasn’t allowed it to crush her.

As Maddie gets closer to her, she begins to unravel Precious’s haunting past—a story of friendship, betrayal, and the unremembered acts of kindness and of love.

“A Man Named Doll” by Jonathan Ames.  From Mulholland Books.

Happy Doll is a charming, if occasionally inexpert, private detective living just one sheer cliff drop beneath the Hollywood sign with his beloved half-Chihuahua half-Terrier, George.

A veteran of both the Navy and LAPD, Doll supplements his meager income as a P.I. by working through the night at a local Thai spa that offers its clients a number of special services. Armed with his sixteen-inch steel telescopic baton, biting dry humor, and just a bit of a hero complex, the ex-cop sets out to protect the women who work there from clients who have trouble understanding the word “no.”

Doll gets by just fine following his two basic rules: bark loudly and act first. But when things get out-of-hand with one particularly violent patron, even he finds himself wildly out of his depth, and then things take an even more dangerous twist when an old friend from his days as a cop shows up at his door with a bullet in his gut.

Kid’s Corner

“Keeping the City Going” by Brian Floca.  From Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books.

We are here at home now, watching the world through our windows. Outside we see the city we know, but not as we’ve seen it before. The once hustling and bustling streets are empty. Well, almost empty. Around the city there are still people, some, out and about. 

These are the people keeping us safe. Keeping us healthy. Keeping our mail and our food delivered. Keeping our grocery stores stocked. Keeping the whole city going.

Brian Floca speaks for us all in this stirring homage to all the essential workers who keep the essentials operating so the rest of us can do our part by sheltering in place during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson.  From Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

A cornerstone hymn chronicling the black experience, “Lift Every Voice and Sing” was declared the official African American National Anthem by the NAACP in 1919. 

First published in 1993, this picture book featuring linocuts by Harlem Renaissance artist Catlett is back in print, with a new Foreword by Newbery and Coretta Scott King Honoree Byran.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment