Check out the latest books at Jervis Public Library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

On Oct. 8, 1823, DeWitt Clinton presided over the inauguration of the Erie Canal with the opening of the section from Albany to west of Rochester with 40,000 people in attendance at the celebration. It was not completed until 1825 but the opening of the section that included Rome had an immediate economic impact on the entire state.

John Bloomfield Jervis (affectionately known to library staff as JBJ) began his civil engineering career as an axeman on the Erie Canal and worked his way into engineering history, allowing him to leave his mark on the City of Rome in the form of his home turned into a public library in the same year the New York Public Library opened, 125 years ago.

Check out the library’s facebook page for virtual programs about the canal and JBJ’s role in the canal, municipal water sources, and railroad transportation.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“The Midnight Library: A Novel” by Matt Haig. From Viking.

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself?

Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.

“A Deadly Education: A Novel” by Naomi Novik.  From Del Rey.

I decided that Orion Lake needed to die after the second time he saved my life. Everyone loves Orion Lake. Everyone else, that is. Far as I’m concerned, he can keep his flashy combat magic to himself. 

I don’t need help surviving the Scholomance. Forget the hordes of monsters and cursed artifacts, I’m probably the most dangerous thing in the place.  Most of the other students in here would be delighted if Orion killed me. Sometimes I think they want me to turn into the evil witch they assume I am. The school certainly does.

But the Scholomance isn’t getting what it wants from me. I may not be anyone’s idea of the shining hero, but I’m going to make it out of this place alive.

“Jack: A Novel” by Marilynne Robinson.  From Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Marilynne Robinson’s mythical world of Gilead, Iowa, and its beloved characters have illuminated and interrogated the complexities of American history, the power of our emotions, and the wonders of a sacred world. 

“Jack” is Robinson’s fourth novel in this now-classic series. In it, Robinson tells the story of John Ames Boughton, the prodigal son of Gilead’s Presbyterian minister, and his romance with Della Miles, a high school teacher who is also the child of a preacher. Their deeply felt, tormented, star-crossed interracial romance resonates with all the paradoxes of American life, then and now. 

Kid’s corner

“Adventures of a Dwergish Girl” by Daniel Pinkwater.  From Tachyon Publications.

Molly O’Malley is a clever, adventurous girl. She is also a Dwerg. Dwergs are strange folks who live very quietly in the Catskill mountains, have lots of gold, and are kind of like dwarves (but also not!).

Molly isn’t interested in cooking and weaving, as she is expected to be. So, she sets off to see the world for herself. Which means a new job, a trip to New York City, prowling gangsters, an adorable king, a city witch, and many historical ghosts. More importantly, it means excellent pizza, new friends, and very quick thinking. Now someone is pursuing the Dwergs for their gold. Can Molly O’Malley save the day?

“Bear Says Thanks” by Karma Wilson.  From Little Simon.

Bear has come up with the perfect way to say thanks—a nice big dinner! When Bear decides to throw a feast, his friends show up one by one with different platters of delicious food to share. There’s just one problem: Bear’s cupboards are bare! What is he to do?

“Grandpa Grumps” by Katrina Moore.  From little bee books.

Daisy’s Yeh-Yeh is visiting for the first time from China, and Daisy is so excited to meet him! She has big plans for all the fun they’ll have together, like tea parties and snow angels, but when Yeh-Yeh arrives, Daisy finds him less jolly than she imagined. Throughout the week, she tries all sorts of things to get him past his grumpiness. Will she be able to make him smile before he goes home?

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