Check out the latest books at Jervis Public Library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open for curbside pickup, and are now taking reservations for computer use inside the library. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570. You can also call to make photocopy/fax/scan appointments.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information. You can also call to make photocopy/fax/scan appointments.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

It’s pumpkin spice season! Did you know you can make your own spice mix at home? The concoction is mostly cinnamon, with a bit of nutmeg, ginger, cloves, and allspice. Get this and more seasonal recipes by checking out a cookbook from the library.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“Transcendent Kingdom: A Novel” by Yaa Gyasi.  From Knopf.

Gifty is a sixth-year PhD candidate in neuroscience at the Stanford University School of Medicine studying reward-seeking behavior in mice and the neural circuits of depression and addiction. Her brother, Nana, was a gifted high school athlete who died of a heroin overdose after an ankle injury left him hooked on OxyContin. Her suicidal mother is living in her bed. 

Gifty is determined to discover the scientific basis for the suffering she sees all around her. But even as she turns to the hard sciences to unlock the mystery of her family’s loss, she finds herself hungering for her childhood faith and grappling with the evangelical church in which she was raised, whose promise of salvation remains as tantalizing as it is elusive. 

“Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World” by Lesley M.M. Blume. From Simon & Schuster.

Just days after the United States decimated Hiroshima and Nagasaki with nuclear bombs, the Japanese surrendered unconditionally. But even before the surrender, the US government and military had begun a secret propaganda and information suppression campaign to hide the devastating nature of these experimental weapons. 

The cover-up intensified as Occupation forces closed the atomic cities to Allied reporters, preventing leaks about the horrific long-term effects of radiation which would kill thousands during the months after the blast. 

For nearly a year the cover-up worked—until New Yorker journalist John Hersey got into Hiroshima and managed to report the truth to the world. 

“The Less Dead” by Denise Mina.  From Mulholland Books.

Dr. Margo Dunlop is at a crossroads. Her adoptive mom just passed away, and Margo misses her so much she can’t begin to empty the house-or, it seems, get her brother on the phone. Not to mention she’s newly single, secretly pregnant, and worried about her best friend’s dangerous relationship. 

In an effort to cheer herself up she goes in search of her birth mother. Instead she finds Nikki, her mother’s sister. Aunt Nikki isn’t what Margo expects, and she brings upsetting news: Margo’s mother is dead. Worse, she was murdered years ago, and her killer is still at large-and sending Nikki threatening letters.

Kid’s Corner

“Dance Like a Leaf” by A. J. Irving. From Barefoot Books.

As her grandmother’s health declines, a young girl begins to lovingly take the lead in their cozy shared autumn traditions. Poetic prose paired with evocative illustrations by Mexican illustrator Claudia Navarro make for a beautiful celebration of life and a gentle introduction to the death of a loved one.

“Evelyn Del Rey Is Moving Away” by Meg Medina.  From Candlewick.

Evelyn Del Rey is Daniela’s best friend. They do everything together and even live in twin apartments across the street from each other: Daniela with her mami and hamster, and Evelyn with her mami, papi, and cat. But not after today—not after Evelyn moves away. 

Until then, the girls play amid the moving boxes until it’s time to say goodbye, making promises to keep in touch, because they know that their friendship will always be special. The tenderness of Meg Medina’s beautifully written story about friendship and change is balanced by Sonia Sánchez’s colorful and vibrant depictions of the girls’ urban neighborhood.

“Name Tags and Other Sixth-Grade Disasters” by Ginger Garrett.  From Carolrhoda Books

Twelve-year-old Lizbeth always has a plan, and those plans have usually worked — until now. No matter what she tries, she can’t get rid of her dad’s new girlfriend, Claire. And when she and her mom move, Lizbeth has to join a sixth-grade class already in progress, where her teacher makes her wear a name tag and she’s seated with three notorious “weirdos.” 

When faced with mandatory participation in a school talent show, Lizbeth and the Weirdos decide to create self portraits. Reluctantly, Lizbeth finds herself becoming friends with people she thought she had nothing in common with — and coming to terms with the things she can’t control.

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