Check out the latest books at Jervis Public Library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is once again open to the public! Face masks and social distancing are required.

Library hours are 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday; and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.

The library has 110,000 books; nearly 20,000 digital books and audiobooks via OverDrive’s Libby app (midyork.overdrive.com); 4,500 DVDs; 6,000 books on CD; nearly 200 magazines and newspapers; and 155 digital magazines.

Borrow unique items including disc golf kits, karaoke machine and CDs, DVD player, VCR, and Kill-a-Watt meter. The library also offers meeting rooms, licensed Notary Public, and one-on-one tech help — call ahead for availability. Access all this with a free library card. To get your library card, bring in identification with your current address. Call 315-336-4570, e-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Events

Thankful Turkeys children’s event — Monday-Wednesday

Monday, Nov. 22, Free Children’s Craft Kits available

Wednesday, Nov. 24, 10:30 a.m., Story Time with Ms. Emily; 11 a.m., in-person teen event: Arts & Crafts

Thursday, Nov. 25, CLOSED for Thanksgiving

Did you know?

On Nov. 20, 1892, Canadian scientist James Bertram Collip was born. He worked on a team that perfected the process allowing insulin to be isolated, removed, and purified, leading to its use to treat diabetes.

To learn more about the research, check out the graphic novel “Fred & Marjorie” by Kerbel. For more information about the history of the disease, check out “Diabetes Rising” by Hurley.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“The Stranger in the Lifeboat: A Novel” by Mitch Albom. From Harper.

Adrift in a raft after a deadly ship explosion, ten people struggle for survival at sea. Three days pass. Short on water, food and hope, they spot a man floating in the waves. They pull him in.

“Thank the Lord we found you,” a passenger says.

“I am the Lord,” the man whispers.

Mitch Albom has written of heaven in the celebrated number one bestsellers The Five People You Meet in Heaven and The First Phone Call from Heaven. Now, for the first time in his fiction, he ponders what we would do if, after crying out for divine help, God actually appeared before us? What might the Lord look, sound and act like?

“The Christmas Bookshop: A Novel” by Jenny Colgan.  From William Morrow Paperbacks.

Laid off from her department store job, Carmen has perilously little cash and few options. The prospect of spending Christmas with her perfect sister Sofia, in Sofia’s perfect house with her perfect children and her perfectly ordered yuppie life does not appeal.

Frankly, Sofia doesn’t exactly want her prickly sister Carmen there either. But Sofia has yet another baby on the way, a mother desperate to see her daughters get along, and a client who needs help revitalizing his shabby old bookshop. So Carmen moves in and takes the job.

Thrown rather suddenly into the inner workings of Mr. McCredie’s ancient bookshop on the picturesque streets of historic Edinburgh, Carmen is intrigued despite herself. The store is dusty and disorganized but undeniably charming. Can she breathe some new life into it in time for Christmas shopping? 

“The Library: A Fragile History” by Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen.  From Basic Books.

Famed across the known world, jealously guarded by private collectors, built up over centuries, destroyed in a single day, ornamented with gold leaf and frescoes, or filled with bean bags and children’s drawings—the history of the library is rich, varied, and stuffed full of incident. 

In “The Library,” historians Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen introduce us to the antiquarians and philanthropists who shaped the world’s great collections, trace the rise and fall of literary tastes, and reveal the high crimes and misdemeanors committed in pursuit of rare manuscripts. In doing so, they reveal that while collections themselves are fragile, often falling into ruin within a few decades, the idea of the library has been remarkably resilient as each generation makes—and remakes—the institution anew. 

Kid’s Corner

“Gladys the Magic Chicken” by Adam Rubin.  From G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers.

Gladys the chicken must be magic. After all, for everyone who encounters her, a wish is granted. The Shepherd Boy wishes to be beautiful, the Brave Swordsman wishes to join the Royal Guard, the Purple Pooh-bah wishes for his only daughter to be happy, and the Learned Princess wishes to escape the palace. 

And one by one, each of these wishes comes true. But . . . is Gladys really magic? Or is everyone making their own fortune? Either way, it adds up to one heck of an adventure for a chicken named Gladys. Blending a classic storybook feel with a thoroughly modern sense of humor, this side-splitting read aloud is perfect for anyone who wishes to see magic in the world—even if they are only looking at a chicken.

“The Tea Dragon Society” by Katie O’Neill.  From Oni Press.

After discovering a lost tea dragon in the marketplace, Greta learns about the dying art form of tea dragon care-taking from the kind tea shop owners, Hesekiel and Erik. As she befriends them and their shy ward, Minette, Greta sees how the craft enriches their lives — and eventually her own.

“Marshmallow & Jordan” by Alina Chau.  From First Second.

Jordan’s days as star player for her school’s basketball team ended when an accident left her paralyzed from the waist down. Now, she’s still the team captain, but her competition days seem to be behind her...until an encounter with a mysterious elephant, who she names Marshmallow, helps Jordan discover a brand new sport.

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