Check out the latest books at Jervis library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

In 1974, Congressman John Porter from Illinois introduced a resolution, which was passed by Congress, to make February “National Bird Feeding Month.” He chose February because it is typically one of the roughest months for birds in North America. His resolution named backyard bird feeding as an “entertaining, educational, and inexpensive pastime enjoyed by children and adults.” The library has several books on bird feeding and identification if you are interested in getting started feeding birds in your backyard.

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Top Titles

“The Nature of Fragile Things” by Susan Meissner. From Berkley.

April 18, 1906: A massive earthquake rocks San Francisco just before daybreak, igniting a devouring inferno. Lives are lost, lives are shattered, but some rise from the ashes forever changed.

Sophie Whalen is a young Irish immigrant so desperate to get out of a New York tenement that she answers a mail-order bride ad and agrees to marry a man she knows nothing about. San Francisco widower Martin Hocking proves to be as aloof as he is mesmerizingly handsome. Sophie quickly develops deep affection for Kat, Martin’s silent five-year-old daughter, but Martin’s odd behavior leaves her with the uneasy feeling that something about her newfound situation isn’t right. 

Then one early-spring evening, a stranger at the door sets in motion a transforming chain of events. Sophie discovers hidden ties to two other women. The first, pretty and pregnant, is standing on her doorstep. The second is hundreds of miles away in the American Southwest, grieving the loss of everything she once loved. 

The fates of these three women intertwine on the eve of the devastating earthquake.

“After the Rain” by Nnedi Okorafor.  From Abrams ComicArts - Megascope.

After the Rain is a graphic novel adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” The drama takes place in a small Nigerian town during a violent and unexpected storm. A Nigerian-American woman named Chioma answers a knock at her door and is horrified to see a boy with a severe head wound standing at her doorstep. He reaches for her, and his touch burns like fire. 

Something is very wrong. Haunted and hunted, Chioma must embrace her heritage in order to survive. John Jennings and David Brame’s graphic novel collaboration uses bold art and colors to powerfully tell this tale of identity and destiny.

Kid’s Corner

“The Boy Who Failed Show and Tell” by Jordan Sonnenblick.  From Scholastic Press.

In a typical school year, every kid has one or two things go wrong. But for Jordan, there’s A LOT going wrong ALL THE TIME.  Take this year. Here are some of the thing going wrong:

His teacher hates him. Like, really hates him. Like, is totally out to get him even when he’s trying to be good, and is willing to fail him on the simplest things, like show and tell. His pet snake has given birth to way, way, way too many baby snakes, all who need a home. There are bullies ready to stomp him when all he has to defend himself with is a lunchbox.

And all this doesn’t even include the freak swing set accident, the fears inside his head, or the funniest class presentation ever.

“Kitchen Cabinet Science Projects” by Michelle Dickinson.  From Penguin Workshop.

This beautifully designed full-color book is filled with science experiments that can be done at home, using the everyday items found in the kitchen with ingredients that cost no more than $5! 

From candy crystals and foamsicles to straw rockets and sticky ice, the experiments demonstrate serious scientific principles in a fun and exciting way, whether for school science fairs, or family fun at home. Written by Michelle Dickinson, a scientist whose studies atomic particles, these precise yet easy-to-follow instructions make mind-blowing science experiments easy for everyone.

“I Am the Longest Dog” by Avery Monsen.  From Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Lucy is the world’s longest dog, but just how long is she? Like, are we talking pretty long? Or super-crazy number-one-record-breaking BANANAS long? See for yourself in this hilarious picture book by best-selling author-illustrator Avery Monsen. (Warning: the dog is very long.)

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