Check out the latest books and activities at Jervis library

Posted

Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., Rome, is open 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday; and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

The library has 110,000 books; 120 board games; nearly 20,000 digital books and audiobooks via OverDrive’s Libby app (midyork.overdrive.com); 4,500 DVDs; 6,000 books on CD; nearly 200 magazines and newspapers; and 155 digital magazines.

Borrow unique items including karaoke machine and CDs, DVD player, VCR, and Kill-a-Watt meter. The library also offers meeting rooms and a licensed notary public — call ahead for availability. Access all this with a free library card. To get your library card, bring in identification with your current address.

Call 315-336-4570, e-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Events

* registration required

Monday, April 25, Free children’s craft kits available; 4 p.m., In-person Teen Event: Maker Monday

Tuesday, April 26, 4 p.m., Thumbprint Art (children’s event); 5 p.m., Therapy Dogs (children’s event)

Wednesday, April 27, 10:30 a.m., Story Time with Ms. Emily; 4 p.m., In-person Teen Event: Ukulele Club*

Thursday, April 28, 6:30 p.m., Evening Story Time with Project Hope

Friday, April 29, 2:30 p.m., In-person Teen Event: Free Play Friday

Did you know?

Bugs Bunny, the beloved Looney Tune, made his first appearance 84 years ago on April 30th, 1938? Bugs has since found his way into the hearts of millions, being featured in comics, cartoons, movies, and more in the United States and abroad.

Read all about it

Top Titles

• “The Investigator” by John Sandford. From G.P. Putnam’s Sons.

By age 24, Letty Davenport has seen more action and uncovered more secrets than many law enforcement professionals. Now a recent Stanford grad with a master’s in economics, she’s restless and bored in a desk job for U.S. Senator Colles. Letty’s ready to quit, but her skills have impressed Colles, and he offers her a carrot: feet-on-the-ground investigative work, in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security. 

Several oil companies in Texas have reported thefts of crude, Colles tells her.  He isn’t so much concerned with the oil as he is with the money: who is selling the oil, and what are they doing with the profits? Rumor has it that a fairly ugly militia group might be involved. Letty is partnered with a DHS investigator, John Kaiser, and they head to Texas.  When the case quicky turns deadly, they know they’re on the track of something bigger. 

• “Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez.  From Berkley.

Montgomery, Alabama, 1973. Fresh out of nursing school, Civil Townsend intends to make a difference, especially in her African American community. At the Montgomery Family Planning Clinic, she hopes to help women shape their destinies, to make their own choices for their lives and bodies.

But when her first week on the job takes her along a dusty country road to a worn-down one-room cabin, Civil is shocked to learn that her new patients, Erica and India, are children—just 11 and 13 years old. Neither of the Williams sisters has even kissed a boy, but they are poor and Black, and for those handling the family’s welfare benefits, that’s reason enough to have the girls on birth control.

As Civil grapples with her role, she takes India, Erica, and their family into her heart. Until one day she arrives at their door to learn the unthinkable has happened, and nothing will ever be the same for any of them.

Kid’s Corner

• “Listen to the Language of the Trees:” by Tera Kelley.  From Dawn Publications.

The fascinating mycorrhizal fungi network runs underground through the roots of trees in the forest allowing for connection and communication. Readers will discover that trees have their own social network to help each other survive and thrive. 

The well-researched details about trees’ own social network will help readers see that the natural world’s survival depends on staying connected and helping others — just like us!

• “A Song Called Home” by Sara Zarr.  From Balzer + Bray.

Lou and her family don’t have much, but for Lou it’s enough. Mom. Her sister, Casey. Their apartment in the city. Her best friend, Beth. It would be better if Dad could stop drinking and be there for her and Casey, and if they didn’t have to worry about money all the time. But Lou doesn’t need better—she only needs enough.

What’s enough for Lou, however, is not enough for Mom. Steve, Mom’s boyfriend, isn’t a bad guy, he’s just…not what Lou is used to. And now, he and Mom are getting married, and that means moving. Packing up life as they’ve known it and storing it in Steve’s garage. Lou will be separated from everything in her small but predictable life, farther from Dad than ever.

• “Different Kinds of Fruit” by Kyle Lukoff.  From Dial Books. YA

Annabelle Blake fully expects this school year to be the same as every other: same teachers, same classmates, same, same, same. So she’s elated to discover there’s a new kid in town. To Annabelle, Bailey is a breath of fresh air. She loves hearing about their life in Seattle, meeting their loquacious parents, and hanging out at their massive house.  

Suddenly sixth grade is anything but the same. And when her irascible father shares that he and Bailey have something big — and surprising — in common, Annabelle begins to see herself, and her family, in a whole new light. 

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here