Check out the latest at Jervis library

Posted

Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., has 110,000 books; tens of thousands of digital books, audiobooks, movies, comics, and music via the hoopla app; nearly 20,000 digital books and audiobooks via OverDrive’s Libby app; 4,500 DVDs; 6,000 books on CD; nearly 200 magazines and newspapers; and 155 digital magazines.

Borrow unique items including fishing poles, karaoke machine and CDs, DVD player, VCR, and Kill-a-Watt meter. The library also offers meeting rooms, licensed Notary Public, and one-on-one tech help — call ahead for availability. Access all this with a free library card. To get your library card, bring in identification with your current address.

Library hours: 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 5:30 p.m. Fridays; 5 p.m. Saturdays. Closed Sundays. Call 315-336-4570 or online at www.jervislibrary.org.

Events

* registration required

Monday, 10 a.m., Medicaid, Child Health Plus, Essential Plan: Health Insurance Information by MVP Health Care; 10 a.m., United Way Tax Prep Assistance*; 6 p.m., Story Time w/ Bella the Therapy Dog; 6:30 p.m., Knit & Crochet Group

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m., Toddler Story Time*; 5 p.m., Unplug & Play Tabletop Games

Wednesday, 12:30 p.m., at Bellamy: STEM toy open play and book giveaway; 2:30 p.m., Drop-In Tech Help

Thursday, 12:30 p.m., at Bellamy: Reading and Spring Craft Activity; 2:30 p.m., Teens Play Board Games!; 3 p.m., On Point for College

Friday, 9:30 a.m., Spring Break Book Sale

Saturday, 9:30 a.m., Spring Break Book Sale; 1 p.m., Unplug & Play Tabletop Games

Read all about it

Top Titles

“A Woman of No Importance” by Sonia Purnell. From Viking.

In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: “She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her.” 

The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill’s “Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.” She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and (despite her prosthetic leg) helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it. 

“Boy Swallows Universe” by Trent Dalton.  From Harper.

Eli Bell’s life is complicated. His father is lost, his mother is in jail, and his stepdad is a heroin dealer. The most steadfast adult in Eli’s life is Slim—a notorious felon and national record-holder for successful prison escapes—who watches over Eli and August, his silent genius of an older brother.

Exiled far from the rest of the world in Darra, a neglected suburb populated by Polish and Vietnamese refugees, this twelve-year-old boy with an old soul and an adult mind is just trying to follow his heart, learn what it takes to be a good man, and train for a glamorous career in journalism.

Kid’s Corner

“The Lost Forest” by Phyllis Root.  From Univ Of Minnesota Press.

A forest, of course, doesn’t need a map to know where to grow. But people need a map to find it. And in 1882 when surveyors set out to map a part of Minnesota, they got confused, or tired and cold (it was November), and somehow mapped a great swath of ancient trees as a lake. For more than seventy-five years, the mistake stayed on the map, and the forest remained safe. 

“The Lost Forest” tells the story of this lucky error and of the 144 acres of old-growth red and white pine it preserved.

On display

Quilting by Barb Acchino

K-3 Club by Shelley Graham Turner

Drawings by Mike Landau

Capitol Theatre

Copper City Community
Connection

Did you know?

The name April comes from the Latin word “to open” and describes the trees opening at springtime. Join us at Bellamy Elementary on April, 18 at 12:30 p.m. to celebrate spring with fun stories and crafts. 

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment