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Check out the latest at Jervis library

Posted 1/17/21

Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, …

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Check out the latest at Jervis library

Posted

Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is open by appointment for curbside pickup, computer use, copy/fax machine, and browsing the book shelves. Call ahead to make an appointment, 315-336-4570.

E-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Online resources

• You can place holds for items from across the Mid York System and pickup at your home library. Request books from other libraries using the online library catalog (or call Jervis at 315-336-4570.)

• RBDigital offers audiobooks, magazines, and language practice for those not in school. No waiting list, no limit to the number of items checked out at once. Use online or download the free app for your device: midyorkny.rbdigital.com

• OverDrive online midyork.overdrive.com or through the Libby app gives you access to audiobooks and ebooks.

Did you know?

January 18 marks the observance of the birthday of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.. MLK day is the only federal holiday that is designated as a day of service to encourage all Americans to volunteer to improve their communities.

To read all about Dr. King’s life and legacy, call the library at 315-336-4570 to make a browsing appointment to choose your own books, or ask a librarian to select a few and make a curbside appointment to pick them up.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“The Best of Me” by David Sedaris.  From Little, Brown and Company.

For more than twenty-five years, David Sedaris has been carving out a unique literary space, virtually creating his own genre. A Sedaris story may seem confessional, but is also highly attuned to the world outside. It opens our eyes to what is at absurd and moving about our daily existence. And it is almost impossible to read without laughing.

Now, for the first time collected in one volume, the author brings us his funniest and most memorable work. In these stories, Sedaris shops for rare taxidermy, hitchhikes with a lady quadriplegic, and spits a lozenge into a fellow traveler’s lap. He drowns a mouse in a bucket, struggles to say “give it to me” in five languages, and hand-feeds a carnivorous bird.

“All the Colors of Night” by Jayne Ann Krentz.  From Berkley.

North Chastain possesses a paranormal talent that gives him the ability to track down the most dangerous psychic criminals. When his father suddenly falls into a coma-like state, North is convinced it was caused by a deadly artifact that traces back to the days of a secret government program known only as the Bluestone Project.

North knows his only hope of saving his father is to find the artifact. He is good when it comes to tracking down killers, but to locate the relic he’s going to need help from a psychic who knows the shadowy world of obsessive collectors, deceptive dealers and ruthless raiders.

With her reputation in ruins after a false accusation, antiques expert Sierra Raines is looking for a fresh start. She turns to the murky backwaters of the paranormal artifacts trade, finding and transporting valuable objects with a psychic provenance. When North Chastain approaches her for help, Sierra takes him on as a client, though not without reservations. North represents the mysterious Foundation, the secretive organization established to police the underworld populated by psychic criminals and those, like Sierra, who make a living in the shadows of that world.

Kid’s Corner

“Outside, Inside” by LeUyen Pham.  From Roaring Brook Press.

Something strange happened on an unremarkable day just before the season changed. Everybody who was outside … went inside.

Outside, it was quieter, wilder, and different. Inside, we laughed, we cried, and we grew. We remembered to protect the ones we love and love the ones who protect us.

While the world changed outside, we became stronger on the inside and believed that someday soon spring would come again.

“Unplugged” by Gordon Korman.  From Balzer + Bray.

As the son of the world’s most famous tech billionaire, spoiled Jett Baranov has always gotten what he wanted. So when his father’s private jet drops him in the middle of a place called the Oasis, Jett can’t believe it.

He’s forced to hand over his cell phone, eat grainy veggie patties, and participate in wholesome activities with the other kids whom he has absolutely no interest in hanging out with.

As the weeks go on, Jett starts to get used to the unplugged life and even bonds with the other kids. But he can’t help noticing that the adults at the Oasis are acting really strange. 

Jett is determined to get to the bottom of things, but can he convince the other kids that he is no longer just a spoiled brat making trouble?

“At the Mountain’s Base” by Traci Sorell.  From Kokila.

At the mountain’s base sits a cabin under an old hickory tree. And in that cabin lives a family – loving, weaving, cooking, and singing. The strength in their song sustains them through trials on the ground and in the sky, as they wait for their loved one, a pilot, to return from war. 

With an author’s note that pays homage to the true history of Native American U.S. service members like WWII pilot Ola Mildred “Millie” Rexroat, this is a story that reveals the roots that ground us, the dreams that help us soar, and the people and traditions that hold us up.

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