REIMBURSEMENT PRESENTED — Don Hall, at right, was presented with a $500 check by the Oneida and Herkimer counties chapter of SCOPE (Shooters Committee on Political Education), for expenses incurred after his firearms were mistakenly confiscated through a state gun control law. From left: Bob Good, SCOPE member and president of Greenway-Verona Mills Fish and Game Club, where the check was presented; Fred Rebscher, chairman of the SCOPE Oneida and Herkimer chapter; George Massoud, treasurer of the SCOPE chapter; Ed Stelzer, SCOPE member; and Hall. (Photo submitted)

Firearms group raises $500 for local man following mixup

Published Jul 17, 2017 at 4:10pm

A firearms ownership advocacy group has raised $500 to
reimburse a local man for expenses incurred after his firearms were mistakenly confiscated through a state gun control law following a Social Security number mixup, the organization has announced.

A $500 check was presented Wednesday to Don Hall by the Oneida and Herkimer counties chapter of SCOPE (Shooters Committee On Political Education).

Hall, president of the Point Rock Fish & Game Club and a Vietnam veteran, had his firearms confiscated through the New York SAFE Act after his identity was mistaken for someone else due to a Social Security number being mistyped at a local hospital, said a SCOPE announcement.

SAFE refers to the Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act — which was passed into law in January 2013.

While Hall did have his firearms returned after the mistake was found, he had to hire an attorney, the announcement said. Hall “did nothing wrong and the members of SCOPE did some fundraising to reimburse him,” the announcement added.

Fred Rebscher, chairman of the local SCOPE chapter, said of the New York SAFE Act that Hall was “trapped by this law, over what appears to be a typographical error.” He said his organization opposes the act, adding it “contains many aspects that needlessly criminalize normal law-abiding citizens....”

SCOPE is a civil rights organization focusing on protection and preservation of the right of firearms ownership under the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Republican state legislators have expressed opposition to some parts of the New York SAFE Act, including supporting legislation that would drop provisions of the law outside New York City. But there has been no repeal.

The law was enacted in 2013 with the support of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in response to a shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn. At the time of its passage, the law was hailed as the toughest gun control law int the nation by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo.